July 2009 Mid-Atlantic tornadoes – Wikipedia

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July 2009 Mid-Atlantic tornadoes
Ww0559 radar init.gif

Radar image of the storm system as it passed through the Northeastern States

Type Tornado outbreak
Duration July 29, 2009
Tornadoes
confirmed
5 confirmed
Max. rating1 EF2 tornado
Duration of
tornado outbreak2
2 hours and 30 minutes
Fatalities 2 injuries
Damage $2.165 million[1]
1Most severe tornado damage; see Enhanced Fujita scale
2Time from first tornado to last tornado

The July 2009 Mid-Atlantic tornadoes were a series of five tornadoes, two of which attained EF2 status, that touched down within one hour and thirty minutes in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

Confirmed tornadoes[edit]

Pennsylvania[edit]

Two tornadoes touched down in Pennsylvania, one in Monroe County and one in Wyoming County.[2] The first tornado was an EF2 in Monroe County that touched down around 1:30 pm EDT and tracked for 5 miles (8.0 km). Five homes lost their roofs and several barns were destroyed along the tornado’s path. Numerous power lines were also downed, resulting in several road closures.[3] This tornado was one of 12 tornadoes to touch down in the county since 1950. In Cherry Valley, 25 power poles were downed, resulting in extensive internet and power outages.[4] In Franklin County, a downburst caused structural damage.[5]

New Jersey[edit]

In New Jersey, one EF2 tornado was confirmed in Sussex County.[6] The tornado tracked for roughly 7 miles (11 km) before dissipating. Along its track, thousands of trees were uprooted and snapped, numerous segments of guardrail were destroyed, acres of farmland were lost and several structures were damaged. The tornado, peaking with winds up to 120 miles per hour (190 km/h) touched down around 2:45 pm EDT and traveled for 15 minutes. The worst damage was along a 2 miles (3.2 km) stretch of the track[7] in Wantage where a state of emergency was declared;[8] in this area, hundreds of trees were tossed in multiple directions, a corn field was decimated by the tornado’s winds and damaged a dairy farm.[7] One 70 feet (21 m) tall silo, made of 40 tons of concrete and steel, was destroyed by the tornado. Two of the barns on the dairy farm were destroyed and two others were severely damaged. A large portion of one of the barns roof was torn off, and was tossed roughly .75 miles (1.21 km) before landing in the yard of another home. Another barn was pick up and twisted around despite being secured by 18 poles anchored 4 feet in the ground.[9]

There were also 100 cows on the farm at the time of the tornado, of which one was reported missing. Residents who saw the tornado reported that two of the cows were picked up and tossed 50 feet (15 m) by the tornado. On the dairy farm property alone, roughly 600 trees were uprooted.[9] Severe storms in the region also produced damaging wind gusts up to 70 miles per hour (110 km/h). Torrential rainfall also fell within these storms, triggering widespread flash flooding. Numerous power lines were downed and a 100 feet (30 m) radio tower collapsed due to the winds.[8] The tornado was one of 145 to touch down in the state since 1950 and the first to hit Wantage in 29 years.[10] Throughout the state, roughly 25,000 residences were left without power due to the storms.[11]

New York[edit]

In Unionville, New York, near the New York-New Jersey state line,[12] a brief EF0 tornado touched down around 3:05 pm EDT.[6] Dozens of trees were damaged and several more were uprooted. The most severe damage took place along County Highway 36.[12]

Maryland[edit]

Around 2:46 pm EDT, an EF1 tornado touched down near Oldtown, Maryland in Allegany County.[6] Several roads were closed due to downed trees and power lines, including route 51. Several homes were also damaged by the tornado.[13] The path of the tornado was estimated to be 5 miles (8.0 km) long.[5] A total of 810 residences were also left without power after the storm.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Tornado Reports: July 29, 2009”. National Centers for Environmental Information. NOAA. Retrieved November 3, 2022.
  2. ^ Staff Writer (July 30, 2009). “Tornado Confirmed in Wyoming County”. WNEP. Archived from the original on August 3, 2009. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  3. ^ “Violent Tornado Rips Through Pennsylvania Towns in Pocono Mountains”. Fox News. Associated Press. July 30, 2009. Archived from the original on August 2, 2009. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  4. ^ Andrew Scott (July 31, 2009). “Cleanup continues after Wednesday’s tornado in Hamilton, Stroud townships (with flyover video)”. Pocono Record. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  5. ^ a b Angelique Gonzalez & Jacqueline Waite (July 30, 2009). “National Weather Service Confirms EF-1 Tornado in Oldto…” Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. Archived from the original on July 31, 2009. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  6. ^ a b c Storm Prediction Center (July 31, 2009). “Storm Reports for July 29, 2009”. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  7. ^ a b Tanya Drobness (July 31, 2009). “Wantage picks up the pieces after facing 120-mph tornado (Page 1)”. The Star-Ledger. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  8. ^ a b Tanya Drobness (July 31, 2009). “Wantage picks up the pieces after facing 120-mph tornado (Page 3)”. The Star-Ledger. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  9. ^ a b Tanya Drobness (July 31, 2009). “Wantage picks up the pieces after facing 120-mph tornado (Page 2)”. The Star-Ledger. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  10. ^ Tanya Drobness (July 31, 2009). “Wantage picks up the pieces after facing 120-mph tornado (Page 4)”. The Star-Ledger. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  11. ^ “Tornado confirmed in northwest New Jersey”. The Philadelphia Inquirer. Associated Press. July 31, 2009. Archived from the original on August 3, 2009. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  12. ^ a b Kieth Goldberg (July 31, 2009). “Weather service confirms tornado hit Unionville”. Times Herald-Record. Archived from the original on July 31, 2009. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  13. ^ “Reported tornado downs trees, utility poles in Western Md”. The Baltimore Sun. Associated Press. July 29, 2009. Archived from the original on July 31, 2009. Retrieved July 31, 2009.
  14. ^ Staff Writer (July 29, 2009). “Twister hits Oldtown”. Cumberland Times-News. Archived from the original on September 13, 2012. Retrieved July 31, 2009.