Minister of Transport (Canada) – Wikipedia

The Minister of Transport (French: Ministre des Transports) is a Minister of the Crown in the Canadian Cabinet. The minister is responsible for overseeing the federal government’s transportation regulatory and development department, Transport Canada, as well as Canada Post, the Saint Lawrence Seaway, Nav Canada, and the Port Authority system.[3] Since 12 January 2021, the position has been held by Omar Alghabra of the Liberal Party.[4]

History[edit]

In 1867, the Canadian Constitution under section 92(10) established federal responsibility for land and sea transportation between provinces and internationally. Most transportation duties and powers were placed under the Minister of Public Works,[5] with responsibilities for ports and harbours going to the Minister of Marine and Fisheries.[6] In 1879, the Department of Public Works was divided in two, with powers and duties over rail and inland sea transport going to the newly formed Minister of Railways and Canals.[7] The Minister of Railways and Canals was one of the most important cabinet posts because of the importance of railways to the economic development of Canada, with three Prime Ministers assuming the position either before or during their premiership.

In Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King’s third cabinet in 1935, C. D. Howe was appointed to both the Minister of Railways and Canals and the Minister of Marine, which was a short-lived position split from the Minister of Marine and Fisheries in 1930.[8] The office of Minister of Transport was created by Mackenzie King in 1936, which was formally a successor to the Minister of Railways and Canals,[9] and C. D. Howe was appointed as the first Minister of Transport.[10]

From 2006 to 2013, the position was styled the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, a name change corresponding with responsibility for Infrastructure Canada being transferred to the portfolio at that time. “Minister of Transport” remained the title for legal purposes.

With the Cabinet shuffle of July 15, 2013, Infrastructure and Communities portfolio was separated from Transport and assigned to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs.[11] In 2015 it became an independent portfolio titled Minister of Infrastructure and Communities.

Transport Canada used to manage most of Canada’s major airports, but in the 1990s, most airports were off-loaded to non-profit private airport authorities. The department is now responsible for transportation safety, appointments to Boards of Governors, and regulation management.

Portfolio[edit]

In addition to Transport Canada, the Minister of Transport is responsible for overseeing 55 other entities,[3] the majority of which are port authorities and airport authorities:

  • Transport Canada
  • Shared governance organizations:
  • Crown corporations:
  • Other entities:

Ministers of Railways and Canals (1879-1936)[edit]

Key:

Ministers of Marine (1930-1936)[edit]

Key:

Ministers of Transport (1936-present)[edit]

Key:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Our Deputy Minister”. Transport Canada.
  2. ^ “Indemnities, Salaries and Allowances”. Parliament of Canada.
  3. ^ a b “The Transport Canada Portfolio”. Transport Canada. Retrieved 2019-11-07.
  4. ^ “Marc Garneau vows to fix Transport Canada’s financial situation”. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2016-04-21.
  5. ^ An Act respecting the office of Receiver-General and Minister of Public Works, S.C. 31 Victoria, c. 12, s. 12
  6. ^ An Act for the organization of the Department of Marine and Fisheries of Canada, S.C. 31 Victoria, c. 57, Sch. 1
  7. ^ An Act respecting the offices of Receiver-General and Minister of Public Works, S.C. 42 Victoria, c. 7, s. 4-5
  8. ^ a b “Fourteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  9. ^ The Department of Transport Act, 1936, S.C. 1 Edward VIII, c. 34
  10. ^ a b c d “Sixteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  11. ^ Technically it was assigned to the President of the Privy Council, which also had responsibility for intergovernmental affairs. http://www.pco-bcp.gc.ca/oic-ddc.asp?lang=eng&txtToDate=2013-07-15&txtPrecis=&Page=&txtOICID=&txtAct=&txtBillNo=&txtFromDate=2013-07-15&txtDepartment=&txtChapterNo=&txtChapterYear=&rdoComingIntoForce=&DoSearch=Search+/+List&pg=2&viewattach=28125&blnDisplayFlg=1
  12. ^ “Third Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  13. ^ “Fourth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  14. ^ “Fifth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  15. ^ “Sixth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  16. ^ “Seventh Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  17. ^ “Eighth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  18. ^ “Ninth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  19. ^ “Tenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  20. ^ “Eleventh Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  21. ^ “Twelfth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  22. ^ “Thirteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  23. ^ “Fourteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  24. ^ “Fifteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  25. ^ “Fifteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  26. ^ “Seventeenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  27. ^ “Eighteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  28. ^ “Nineteenth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  29. ^ “Twentieth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  30. ^ “Twenty-First Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  31. ^ “Twenty-Second Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  32. ^ “Twenty-Third Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  33. ^ “Twenty-Fourth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  34. ^ “Twenty-Fifth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  35. ^ “Twenty-Sixth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  36. ^ “Twenty-Seventh Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.
  37. ^ a b “Twenty-Eighth Ministry – The Ministries – Guide to Canadian Ministries since Confederation”. Privy Council Office.